Welcome to Wavechasers, led by Prof. Matthew Alford.  You know the 20'-30' waves we see and surf on beaches like Pipeline and Jaws? Piddling! The waves we study are beneath the sea surface, 1000's of meters down, and can be as large as 300 m (1000') high (think: underwater waves as large as skyscrapers). 

More interesting still, they travel all the way across oceans, and eventually break just like surface waves do. Finally, consider that these waves can cause submarines to hit the bottom or breach the surface, and the heat moved around by the breaking has profound implications for the oceans' circulation - which in turn impacts the climate. So we build instruments in our lab to monitor and better understand their propagation and breaking, spend about 1-2 months a year traveling all over the world deploying the systems and trying to understand the data.

Our mission is to use all the tools available to track these subsea monsters across the globe. We try to do the best possible science, educate as many people as possible about the oceans, and have as much fun as possible along the way.


The best way to find out about us is to watch the pilot created by Wide Eye Productions or the story in Ocean Currents.  Then go tell all your friends at Discovery Channel that they should have made this into a documentary special!

Check out our blog archive to get a feel for the kinds of things we do.

  

What's New
  • Wavechasers article on deep breaking lee waves selected for American Geophysical Union Research Spotlight
    Posted Apr 22, 2014, 1:05 PM by Matthew Alford
  • Alford on ocean panel for students Over 1,000 students participated in the web panel, where four of the finalists from the Ocean180 video challenge fielded questions.You can see the full video here.
    Posted Apr 14, 2014, 5:54 PM by Matthew Alford
  • Wavechasers video is the winner! Over 40,000 middle school students chose our video as the winner!See the link to this fabulous outreach program at ocean180.org; see our winning video there too.
    Posted Apr 14, 2014, 8:53 AM by Matthew Alford
  • Wavechasers video is a finalist in outreach contest  Our video has made the final round of ten videos, with the winners to be chosen by over 42,000 high school students around the world.  The contest is part ...
    Posted Jan 12, 2014, 11:26 AM by Matthew Alford
  • Samoan Passage Processes Cruise underway The Wavechasers team is back in Samoa for the third and final Samoan Passages cruise!  Follow us here.
    Posted Jan 9, 2014, 9:22 PM by Matthew Alford
Showing posts 1 - 5 of 44. View more »
In the News
  • New Wavechasers article reveals properties of Puget Sound source waters King 5 news picked up the story and did a great job with it - see it here.See the news article at http://www.washington.edu/news/2014/04/14 ...
    Posted Apr 14, 2014, 6:36 PM by Matthew Alford
  • Wavechasers and US embassy in Samoa shrink heads PRESS RELEASE (issued by US embassy in Samoa)   Samoa Victim Support Group is Shrinking Heads! Yes we do mean that literally, but don’t worry, they are only Styrofoam heads ...
    Posted Jan 12, 2014, 10:56 AM by Matthew Alford
  • Alford quoted in Science Alford was quoted in a recent article by Eli Kintisch, "A Sea Change for U.S. Oceanography," on the current status and future of oceanography.  
    Posted Apr 3, 2013, 6:11 PM by Matthew Alford
  • Former wave chaser puts internal waves on the bloggo- and tweeto-spheres Kim Martini, the first PhD student from the Wavechasers group, has moved on to a postdoc with Harper Simmons at University of Alaska Fairbanks, but is still finding time to ...
    Posted Aug 9, 2012, 8:33 PM by WaveChasers APL
  • Wavechasers and R/V Revelle top story in Samoa The Revelle hosted visits from two groups of Samoan scientists and students as well as two news teams while were loading the ship (photos here at the US embassy site ...
    Posted Jul 21, 2012, 8:13 PM by WaveChasers APL
Showing posts 1 - 5 of 7. View more »


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